OG 2012 Track & Field: August 12: U.S. again the world’s no. 1 track & field team

August 12, 2012 by · 13 Comments
Filed under: Olympic Games, Track & Field 

LOS ANGELES, August 12, 2012 – When USA Track & Field next bellows about having the world’s no. 1 track team, believe it. With Meb Keflezghi’s fourth in the marathon today, the track & field competition was completed and showed just how powerful the U.S. continues to be in the premiere Olympic sport:

• The U.S. scored 303 total points, using the IAAF’s points-scoring system of 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 for eight places, miles ahead of Russia’s second-place total of 176.5. How good is this?

Consider that it’s the most for the combined U.S. track & field team since 1984 in Los Angeles (399), the most in a non-boycotted Games since 1932 in Los Angeles (361) and the most in a Games held outside the U.S. since Paris in 1924 (326)! It’s almost 100 points more than in Beijing four years ago (207)!

The American team had more first (9), second (13), third (7), fourth (9), fifth (7) and sixth (6) places than any other country, and 56 finishes in the top eight. No one else was close.

On the medal stand, the U.S. team collected 29, one short of the “Project 30″ target, but still the most since Barcelona (30) in 1992. The second-place Russians had 18, 16 of them in the women’s competition.

• The U.S. men scored 162 points to 62 for Kenya in second place, the most since Atlanta in 1996 (175) . . . and a long way from the paltry 105 points in Bejing. The American men tallied 15 medals, one more than in Bejing 2008 (14), three better than Sydney in 2000 (12), but less than in Athens in 1996 (19).

• The U.S. women had one of their greatest meets in history, with 141 points, to win the team title from Russia (136) and 14 medals. The points total is the most since Los Angeles in 1984 (157.5), and the second-highest ever, meaning it’s the most in a non-boycotted Games.

The 14 women’s medals are more than any American women’s track team save the boycott-impacted 1984 Games (16). Outside the U.S., the previous best mark had been the 1992 Games in Barcelona, with 10 medals, the only two previous Games in which U.S. women had reached double digits in medals.

Despite the success, there are plenty of complainers out there (and I did read your e-mails) about the “failures” in the sprints and elsewhere. Consider, however, that this American team suffered badly from injuries, losing two pretty-sure medals in the 200 m with Walter Dix and 400 m with LaShawn Merritt. Suddenly that moves the medal count to 31 and at age 26, if Merritt was right, who is to say he wouldn’t have beaten back Kirani James, and then triumphed in the 4×400 m relay? Maybe we’ll know next year. Meanwhile, the Jamaicans were at full strength, although Asafa Powell didn’t show well in the 100 m final and then was left off the relay.

There were other U.S. losses too, such as Chris Solinsky in the 10,000 m, a still-not-right David Oliver in the hurdles, a still-recovering Tyson Gay not able to run the 200 m, Jeshua Anderson in the 400 m hurdles and so on. We’ll have a look later in the week at the U.S. team performance at the Games vis-a-vis the Olympic Trials.

For now, the U.S. can savor outstanding results, especially on the women’s side, and look forward to 2013. More on that later this week, too.

Final Scoresheets:
• Olympic T&F team scoring tracker – final: click here.
• Olympic T&F medal scoring tracker – final: click here.
• Full IAAF Placing Table scoring: click here.
• Comparison scoring and medals tracker 2000-12: click here.

(You can stay current with Rich’s technology, sports and Olympic commentaries by following him at www.twitter.com/RichPerelman.)

OG 2012 Track & Field: August 11: U.S. squad sweeps men, women’s, overall team titles and men’s and overall medals lead!

August 10, 2012 by · 3 Comments
Filed under: Olympic Games, Track & Field 

LOS ANGELES, August 11, 2012 – American track and field fortunes have ebbed and flowed and the U.S. has been counted as a “has-been” many times in the past two decades, most recently after modest performances in Sydney in 2000. What a change in London!

The U.S. men crushed the field once again in the medal count, with 15 to Jamaica’s seven and five for Kenya, and led the points race, 157-53 over Jamaica. It’s the 26th time in 26 Olympic Games in which the U.S. has competed that the American men have won the medal and points titles.

The total of 15 medals, with the marathon to go, is one better than in Beijing 2008 (14) and three better than Sydney (12). It trails the Athens total of 19 from 2004 and the 16 won in Atlanta in 1996. The last time the American men reached 20 medals was 1992 in Barcelona . . . the last time the combined teams reached 30 total medals.

The U.S. won the women’s points race, 141-136, over the Russians, collecting the top spot for the first time in a non-boycotted Games since 1968, but lost the medal count, 16-14, as the Russians collected seven medals on the final day of women’s competition.

And there are new stars emerging, like jumping jack Brigetta Barrett, who surprised with a silver in the women’s high jump, and relays coach Jon Drummond, whose charges only set one world and two American records in the past two days.

[Before we get going, please note (1) we’re using the Track & Field News Olympic previews as our form charts, and (2) we’re using the IAAF’s points-scoring system of 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 for eight places.]

Walks:
Strong performances by the Russians (1-5-6) and Chinese (3-7) in the men’s 50 km Walk, but we may have seen the last men’s points from both countries in this race. If so, the Chinese will finish with three medals (all in the walks) and 27 points in the men’s competition, significant progress from 2008, when they had no medals and just five points in Beijing.

The Russians have had a terrible meet. If you’re complaining about the U.S. men, consider that the Russian men scored 56 points with five medals in Beijing four years ago, but have so far managed only 40 1/2 points and two medals in London. Ouch! Let us not forget that Moscow will host the 2013 World Championships . . . how are ticket sales going for that?

China and Russia dominated the women’s 20 km Walk, claiming all the medals and the first six places. The Russian 1-2 brings them within one medal of the U.S. on the women’s side (12-11) and 119-98 on the points table with three events left.

Men’s Javelin
No impact on the team scoring, but with this being one of the worst U.S. events, it’s worth noting the success of the throwers from Trinidad & Tobago and Kenya, who have both thrown over 80 meters (262+ feet) this season. In fact, Trinidad’s Keshorn Walcott set national records on his first two throws and won the gold medal at 277-6 (84.58 m), the first-ever medal for Trinidad in a field event!

Men’s 5000 m:
The first few laps were pathetic, at 71+ seconds, but Mo Farah completed a great double in a terrible time of 13:41.66 but a great 52.9 last lap. Bernard Lagat looked like a medal possibility entering the final straight, but tripped with 100 m to go and lost his chance. With Galen Rupp’s seventh, the U.S. didn’t medal, but gained a point on the dope sheet.

It’s the eighth 5-10 double in Olympic history and the second in succession after Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia did it in 2008. Farah is the first European to pull off the season since Lasse Viren’s double-double in 1972 and 1976 for Finland.

Women’s 800 m:
The Russian duo of Mariya Savinova (1:56.19) and Yekaterina Poistogova (1:57.53) earned gold and bronze and with Yelena Arzhakova’s sixth, a total of 17 points, a major +8 against the dope and giving the Russians a 13-12 medal lead against the Americans. For the U.S., Alysia Johnson Montano led at the 400 m mark at 56.31, but finished fifth and earned four points.

Women’s High Jump
Russian hopes were high and Anna Chicherova and Svetlana Skholina were sitting 1-2 through 6-6 3/4 (2.00 m), but suddenly Arizona’s Brigetta Barrett continued her late-season surge, with a PR 6-7 (2.01 m) for second at the Trials and another PR of 6-8 (2.03 m) on her second try to win a silver medal!

Chaunte Lowe cleared 6-5 1/2 (1.97 m), but couldn’t do better.

Women’s 4 x 400 m relay:
Any doubt? The BBC splits had DeeDee Trotter at 50.5, opening an enormous lead that only got bigger, then Allyson Felix at a stunning 47.9, then Francena McCorory at 49.4 and Sanya Richards-Ross at 49.2 for 3:16.87, the fifth straight 4 x 400 m on the track for the American women.

Russia with second and Jamaica in third finished as expected, but the race wasn’t close. With a silver medal, however, the Russians collected seven on the final day to finish ahead of the U.S., 16-14. That’s one more than each was expected to earn in the pre-meet projections.

Men’s 4 x 100 m relay:
The U.S. sported a new line-up of Trell Kimmons, Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Ryan Bailey for the final, and the result was a new American record of 37.04, but it wasn’t enough to beat Jamaica’s world record of 36.84.

All credit to USA Track & Field relays coach Drummond, whose teams set a world women’s record of 40.82, and men’s American records of 37.38 and 37.04 (equaling Jamaica’s previous world-record time). Add Walter Dix to the mix in 2013 and who knows what the limits are . . . no dropped sticks and plenty of promise for the future.

Where are we?
Men: After nine days and with 23 of 24 events scored, the U.S. is running away with the team title at 157 points, with Jamaica standing second at 53 and Great Britain third at 51.5. Only the marathon remains.

The U.S. men have 15 medals, two less than projected at this point, with Jamaica at seven and Kenya at five.

Women: With all 23 events scored, the U.S. won the points race for the first time since 1984 and the first time in a non-boycotted Games since 1968! The American team scored 141 points (-1 points vs. the dope) to 136 for Russia (-32), which scored an amazing 57 points on the final day.

The U.S. women won 14 medals in all, one more than projected, but finished second to Russia, which won 16 (also +1). It’s more than any American women’s track team save the boycott-impacted 1984 Games here in Los Angeles (16). Outside the U.S., the previous best mark had been the 1992 Games in Barcelona, with 10 medals. In fact, those were the only two previous Games in which U.S. women tracksters had reached double digits on the medal table.

Jamaica and Ethiopia had five medals each to tie for third on the table.

Overall: The U.S. has a combined total of 298 points, well ahead of Russia (176.5), Jamaica at 107, Kenya at 99 and Great Britain (94).

The U.S. has 29 medals – one short of the “Project 30″ goal, but with possibilities still in the men’s marathon tomorrow. Russia, with a great final day from its women’s team (seven medals) and eight medals on the day (three in the walks) and will likely finish with 18, trailed by Jamaica at 12, nine for Kenya and eight for Germany.

Current scoresheets:
• Olympic T&F team scoring tracker after Day 9: click here.
• Olympic T&F medal scoring tracker after Day 9: click here.
• Full IAAF Placing Table scoring: click here.

More each day after the close of competition; stay tuned!

(You can stay current with Rich’s technology, sports and Olympic commentaries by following him at www.twitter.com/RichPerelman.)

OG 2012 Track & Field: August 10: American 4×100 women make history, but so do the U.S. 4×400 men

August 9, 2012 by · 4 Comments
Filed under: Olympic Games, Track & Field 

LOS ANGELES, August 10, 2012 – A record set by a county that no longer exists was blown away by the U.S. women’s 4 x 100 m, who took 0.55 off a 27-year-old record held by the German (not very-) Democratic Republic with a sensational 40.82 time.

It was a startling performance on a mixed day for the U.S., which saw 1500 m medal favorite Morgan Uceny fall for the second straight championship final, and the U.S. lost the 4 x 400 m relay for the first time since 1952.

[Before we get going, please note (1) we’re using the Track & Field News Olympic previews as our form charts, and (2) we’re using the IAAF’s points-scoring system of 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 for eight places.]

Qualifying:
The U.S. women’s 4 x 400 m quartet of Keshia Baker, Francena McCorory, Diamond Dixon and DeeDee Trotter didn’t have too much trouble, winning the second heat in 3:22.09. Dixon took over the lead from the Russians on the third leg and Trotter stormed to the finish to lead all qualifiers. Look for Allyson Felix and Sanya Richards-Ross to be added to the American team for the final; hard to imagine anything other than a gold medal here; it would be the fifth in a row on the track, although the 2000 team was disqualified later for Marion Jones’s drug positive.

The men’s 4×100 m team of Jeff Demps, Darvis Patton, Trell Kimmons and Justin Gatlin not only got the stick around, but set a new American record of 37.38, no. 4 all-time and bettering the 37.40 Olympic winner and then-world record (anchored by Carl Lewis) from Barcelona in 1992! Subbing Tyson Gay for Kimmons to the third leg tomorrow should mean another AR, but it still may not be enough against Bolt & Co. Is Gatlin the 2012 version of Eddie Hart in 1972?

Men’s Pole Vault:
The U.S. lost a projected medal as Brad Walker cleared no height, missing three times at 18-6 1/2 (5.65 m). After winning the first 16 Olympic competitions in a row from 1896-1968, the U.S. has won a medal in only five of the succeeding 11 Games and now hasn’t medaled at all since 2004 in Athens, when Tim Mack and Toby Stevenson went 1-2.

Germany was the big winner on points in the event, scoring 13 with the silver and bronze medalists (still -3 on the dope).

Women’s Hammer:
Tatyana Lysenko of Russia nailed an Olympic record of 254-5 (77.56 m) in the first round, but Germany’s Betty Heidler threatened her in the fifth round with a throw that was right at the “gold-medal line,” but the distance didn’t come up due to some kind of malfunction of the measuring system, and was then called a foul. It took half an hour, but she was finally credited with 253-0 (77.13 m) and the bronze medal. No doubt more protests will ensue.

Lysenko improved to 256-6 (78.18 m) in the sixth round and won, but even so, the eight points for Russia was -3 vs. the dope sheet.

Women’s 5,000 m:
Ethiopians and Kenyans took the top six places, in alternating positions, with the British runners in seventh and eighth. Meseret Defar, Tirunesh Dibaba and Gelete Burka scored 18 points (+4 vs. the dope), with the Kenyan trio of Vivian Cheruiyot, Sally Kipyego and Viola Kibiwot tallying (-4).

Molly Huddle of the U.S. was projected for seventh (two points), but she and Julie Culley were relegated to the back of the pack with three laps to go and finished 11th (Huddle, 15:20.29) and 14th (Culley, 15:28.22).

Women’s 4 x 100 m relay:
40.82!

“This is as close to perfection in relay running as we will see,” said the BBC’s Stuart Storey after the U.S. crushed the DDR record of 41.37 from the 1985 World Cup. Tianna Madison ran away from Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce on the opening leg, and then the American lead got bigger from there, thanks to Allyson Felix, Bianca Knight and Carmelita Jeter.

How good was the race? The time would rank no. 7 on this year’s U.S. BOYS high school list!

To use a vastly overused word that actually applies . . . that was AWESOME.

Women’s 1,500 m:
Lightning does strike twice, as Morgan Uceny fell and tumbled to the track with a lap to go as the pace revved up for a fast finish, eventually won by Turkey’s Asli Cakir at a pedestrian 4:10.23. Uceny fell with 150 meters to go in last year’s World Championships final in Daegu as well.

She was favored for a bronze medal and with Shannon Rowbury sixth, the U.S. scored three points against seven on the dope sheet. Russia’s Tatyana Tomashova was fourth, -1 vs. the dope sheet.

Men’s 4 x 400 m relay:
Another disappointment for the U.S., losing this race for the first time after 12 straight finals wins in which the Americans had finished the race, going back to 1956. U.S. teams failed to win in 1972 (no team) and 1980 (didn’t compete), and won on the track, but was disqualified for doping in 2000.

Bryshon Nellum, Josh Mance and Tony McQuay had the U.S. first at the final hand-off to Angelo Taylor, but Ramon Miller’s 43.8 split (from Peter Matthews in the BBC booth) was enough to pass Taylor down the final straightaway. Missing LaShawn Merritt, who brought the U.S. from behind to win at Daegu in 2011, really hurt in the end.

Even so, all honor to Manteo Mitchell’s opening leg for the U.S. in the heats yesterday, which was completed with a broken leg! No wonder he ran 46.1 . . . but Mance followed with a 44.6, then McQuay at 43.65 and Nellum at 44.37 to get the U.S. to the final.

Where are we?
Men: After eight days and with 19 of 24 events scored, the U.S. is running away with the team title at 143 points, with Jamaica standing second at 45. But let’s be honest, American hearts are beating slower after the loss in the 4 x 400 m relay.

The U.S. men have 14 medals, one less than projected at this point, with Jamaica at six and Germany and Kenya at four each.

Women: After eight days and with 19 of 23 events scored, the U.S. has 119 points (+1 points vs. the dope) to 79 for Russia (-40), but it isn’t over as the Russians have a large contingent in tomorrow’s events. This was easily the “worst” day for the U.S. women in this meet, with Uceny’s disappointment in the 1500 m.

The U.S. women have 12 medals, one more than expected at this point, with Russia at nine (as projected at this point). The Ethiopians have five, ahead of Kenya and Jamaica at four each.
Overall: The U.S. has a combined total of 262 points, well ahead of Russia (104.5), Jamaica at 93 and Ethiopia and Kenya (52) at 83.

Current scoresheets:
• Olympic T&F team scoring tracker after Day 8: click here.
• Olympic T&F medal scoring tracker after Day 8: click here.
• Full IAAF Placing Table scoring: click here.

More each day after the close of competition; stay tuned!

(You can stay current with Rich’s technology, sports and Olympic commentaries by following him at www.twitter.com/RichPerelman.)

Olympic Games 2012: Underdog U.S. now projected to win overall medal count

August 9, 2012 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Olympic Games 

LOS ANGELES, August 9, 2012 – The United States Olympic team is now projected to win the most medals at the Games of the XXX Olympiad.

I’m not sure I can believe it, but there it is. Although the Chinese have been long favored to post the highest medal count in London, my projections show that the U.S. will top the medals chart once again, as it has from the 1996 Games forward.

The situation (any mistakes are mine alone!):

China:
As of 10:30 a.m. Pacific time (6:30 p.m. in London), the Chinese sit at 78 medals and have a maximum of 18 more medal possibilities based on their remaining entries:

• Boxing: one medal coming in the men’s 49kg division;
• Canoe: three remaining entries, all with at least a shot at medals;
• Diving: two events with two entries each means four medals;
• Modern Pentathlon: four entries (two each in men and women), but no medals expected;
• Synchro Swimming: team entry is expected to medal;
• Tae Kwon Do: one medal coming on the women’s side, one male entry left;
• Wrestling: one women’s medal coming, two other men’s entries (not expected to medal).

If all of the Chinese entries won medals, they would finish with a total of 96, with 90 a much more likely total. That’s down from 100 medals won on home turf in Beijing in 2008, a very fine performance since the average “home games” bump is about 14 more medals.

United States:
The Americans have 83 medals at the moment, with lots more to come:

• Team medals likely or assured in men’s and women’s basketball, women’s football, women’s volleyball and women’s water polo: five in all;
• Track & Field: after yesterday’s seven-medal bonanza, the U.S. still has likely medals ahead in all four relays (if they don’t drop the stick), two in the decathlon, two in the men’s triple jump and women’s high jump (that’s 9 more) with possibilities in the men’s 800, men’s 200, men’s vault, women’s 1,500 and men’s 5,000 and maybe even the men’s marathon (as many as six more);
• Additional medal possibilities are available in men’s BMX cycling, sailing and men’s freestyle wrestling.

Just based on the likely medals, the U.S. will add 14 more for a total of 97, one more than the Chinese total if every one of the remaining Chinese entries won a medal.

It’s an astonishing story for the U.S., which based on the results of the most recent World Championships prior to the Games as compiled by the highly-respected Italian Olympic organizer Luciano Barra, stood to finish third to the Chinese (100) and Russians (79), with 78 total medals (his projections did not include tennis).

There are some very interesting implications to these results, which will be discussed when the dust has settled, but for now, the Stars & Stripes is looking like a very Grand Old Flag.

(You can stay current with Rich’s technology, sports and Olympic commentaries by following him at www.twitter.com/RichPerelman.)

OG 2012 Track & Field: August 9: Ho hum, four more medals!

August 9, 2012 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Olympic Games, Track & Field 

LOS ANGELES, August 9, 2012 – Usain Bolt defended his title and plenty of criticism will be aimed at the American sprint corps for failing to medal in the 200, but the U.S. team continued to pile up the medals, winning four more in the decathlon and men’s triple jump.

[Before we get going, please note (1) we’re using the Track & Field News Olympic previews as our form charts, and (2) we’re using the IAAF’s points-scoring system of 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 for eight places.]

Qualifying/Morning:
The U.S. men didn’t qualify anyone into the final of the 400 meters, but they’re in the final of the 4×400 m relay . . . whew!

The team of Manteo Mitchell (you remember him: fifth at the Trials in 44.96?), Josh Mance, Tony McQuay and Bryshon Nellum ran 2:58.87 to finish second to the Bahamas (anchored by Chris Brown), which had the same time. It’s the fourth-fastest qualifying time in Olympic history.

McQuay (the Florida junior) blazed a 43.65 for his leg and Nellum (late of USC) was clocked at 44.37, so Mitchell and USC sophomore Mance averaged a quite-mediocre 45.4 apiece. What about the final? Perhaps Angelo Taylor? And where is Jeremy Wariner?

At least the U.S. didn’t drop the stick.

Meanwhile, Chaunte Lowe and Brigetta Barrett both made the women’s high jump final, but UCLA alum Amy Acuff did not, likely the end of a brilliant career.

Qualifying/Evening:
In the women’s 800 m, Alysia Johnson-Montano ran a very fine 1:58.42 in the second semi to make the final, but Alice Schmidt and Geena Gall did not advance.

In the women’s 4×100 m relay, running out of lane two, Tianna Madison, Jeneba Tarmoh, Bianca Knight and Lauryn Williams of the U.S. blazed to a 41.64 clocking – no. 14 all-time and no. 2 in Olympic history, with the last two exchanges looking quite sharp. Allyson Felix and Carmelita Jeter are sure to be added for the final. The world record of 41.37 by the DDR is not out of reach . . . if the U.S. can get the stick around in the final.

Men’s Triple Jump:
Will Claye took the lead at 57-6 1/2 (17.54 m) in the second round, while Christian Taylor fouled twice before coming up with a 56-3 1/4 (17.15 m) jump to advance. Then it was Taylor, who unloaded a 58-5 1/4 jump (17.81 m), the no. 9 performance in U.S. history, in the fourth round to take the lead. Claye responded with a 57-9 3/4 (17.62 m) bomb in the fourth round to cement his silver status.

On the points table, the U.S. matched the pre-meet predictions for gold and silver.

Men’s 800 m:
In the greatest 800 m of all time, Daniel Rudisha’s world record of 1:40.91 dragged home a series of staggering times, including both Americans breaking 1:43! All credit to ex-USC star Duane Solomon, whose 1:42.85 in fourth makes him second all-time U.S. to his coach, UCLA’s Johnny Gray (1:42.60), with Nick Symmonds now third all-time U.S. at 1:42.95. Fantastic!

On the points table, the U.S. claimed nine, +2 against the dope sheet. Kenya’s gold and bronze earned 14 vs. eight projected (+6). One low note: on the NBCOlympics.com stream, two commercials were inserted after the introductions and the start was missed.

Men’s 200 m:
Wallace Spearmon ran pretty well at 19.90, but it was only good enough for fourth! The Jamaican sweep of the medals gave them 21 points, +3 on the dope sheet. The U.S. lost three points on the dope sheet with only one finalist.

There were six previous medal sweeps in this event, all by the U.S. It’s the first an American has failed to medal in this event since 2000 and only the fourth time in Olympic history (including 1980) that the U.S. hasn’t won a medal here.

Men’s Decathlon:
Ashton Eaton and Trey Hardee were supposed to be 1-2 and they finished just that way: Eaton’s 8,869 (no. 8 all-time) was 198 points ahead of everyone and Hardee closed nicely in the final 200 m in the 1,500 m to finish at 8,671, 148 points ahead of bronze medalist Leonel Suarez. Score 15 for the U.S., as expected.

Women’s Javelin:
No significant team scoring implications here, as the Russians did not score. Czech Barbora Spotakova repeated as Olympic champ, a feat only accomplished previously by Ruth Fuchs of the GDR.

Where are we?
Men: After seven days and with 17 of 24 events scored, the U.S. now leads Jamaica, 136-45 and is +9 on the dope sheet. Jamaica is +8, but the Russians are now -49 (just 13 points!) and the Kenyans are -17.

The U.S. men have 13 medals, just as projected at this point, with Jamaica at six and Kenya at four.

Women: After seven days and with 15 of 23 events scored, the U.S. continues at 108 (no finalists today), with Russia still second at 66 (-32 vs. projections) and Jamaica third at 41 (-4 vs. the dope).

The U.S. women have 11 medals, two more than expected at this point, with Russia at eight (as projected).

Overall: The U.S. has a combined total of 244 points (+14), well ahead of Jamaica (86), Russia (79) and Kenya (68).

On the medals front, the U.S. is now at 24, one more than in Bejing, with more to come. The Russians are next best, with nine.

Current scoresheets:
• Olympic T&F team scoring tracker after Day 7: click here.
• Olympic T&F medal scoring tracker after Day 7: click here.
• Full IAAF Placing Table scoring: click here.

More each day after the close of competition; stay tuned!

(You can stay current with Rich’s technology, sports and Olympic commentaries by following him at www.twitter.com/RichPerelman.)

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